Taste Test Me

“Taste and see that the LORD is good. How happy is the man who takes refuge in Him!” (Psalm 34:8, HCSB)

One scholar writes that taste can mean “judge” in the sense of determining for oneself whether God is actually good. To “see” has the same concept.

Jonathan Edwards, in a sermon entitled A Divine and Supernatural Light, described the difference between believing information and experiencing the same:

There is a difference between having a rational judgment that honey is sweet, and having a sense of its sweetness. A man may have the former that knows not how honey tastes; but a man cannot have the latter unless he has an idea of the taste of honey in his mind. So there is a difference between believing that a person is beautiful, and having a sense of his beauty…when a heart is sensible of the beauty and amiableness of a thing, it necessarily feels pleasure in the apprehension (Edwards, Works. Vol.2, 14).

God is so certain of satisfying our deepest cravings, that He actually implores us to experience him for ourselves—to experience the divine taste-test.

About Lazo

Lazo is the pastor for preaching and vision at Reality SB. He is committed to spreading the value of our union with Christ in Santa Barbara, through the expository preaching of God's Word. You might like these blog posts, 5 Wrong Ways To Comfort Hurting People, or Daisy Love and the Magic Eraser. You can follow Chris on twitter at @LazoChris.

Posted on September 13, 2013, in Scripture. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I work with a beekeeper who manages hundreds of colonies and the fun thing about processing the honey is marking what locations the honey came from and then tasting it. When can then taste honey that is from an apple orchard, a lavender field, a vineyard, a strawberry field. The fruit is nuanced through the honey.

    When I enjoy honey and enjoy Jesus, I often find myself reflecting on the fruit found in Him.

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