Top 5 books I read in 2013

I don’t know what others mean when they say “top 5 books,” but for me, it’s pretty straightforward:

  1. What I enjoyed reading most
  2. What impacted the way I think most
  3. If it uncovered a new idea for me
  4. If I was carried through the entire book
  5. I would recommend it to others
  6. I would read it more than once

Ok, let’s get started at the top of the list…

1. When the Church was a Family: Recapturing Jesus’ Vision for Authentic Christian Community, by Joseph Hellerman.

Ever feel frustrated over the individualism and consumerism punctuating the American church? Ever wish your local church was more like the family you read about in the book of Acts? Do you long for revival in your city? This is the book you need to read. But brace yourself–you’re probably not impervious to Hellerman’s piercing diagnosis. Of all the books I read in 2013, this gave me the most chills, the most hope, and the most excitement for the future. But it cost me dearly.

2. Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith, by Michael Reeves.

The Trinity is simultaneously the most important Christian belief, and the most difficult to understand (one might think). Reeves delivers it simpler than vanilla, and more delicious than salted caramel. In fact, his adjectives often remind me of food, with lines like, “Such is the spreading goodness that rolls out of the very being of God” (29), or “The Father, Son and Spirit have always been in delicious harmony” (59). These simple, yet vivid descriptions of the relationships between Father, Son, and Holy Spirit will cause you to reel in joy, and desire to get caught up into the same.

3. Biblical Theology in the Life of the Church: A Guide for Ministry, by Michael Lawrence.

Biblical Theology (BT) is that area of study that looks at how the entire Bible is unified by a single story. There are some BT books that show you the story or themes unfolding through the Bible in a narrative fashion. Others, like this one, show you how to interpret the story itself. Not only does Lawrence nail this topic, but he is very comprehensive, including exegesis, systematics, and other areas of Bible study that intersect with BT. He masterfully lays it all out with practical, and fascinating precision. This is a book I am constantly referencing.

4. Preaching Without Notes, by Joseph M. Webb.

If you preach, you might consider this method. Preaching without notes brings the speaker to life, allows engagement with the listeners, and forces the preacher to condense their (oft-times scattered) ideas to a single, unforgettable point. Even the days I choose to use notes–which has it’s own merits–I still reference this book for it’s helpful methods. To preach without notes, there must be a fundamental shift in the way you think about the sermon itself, and that affects how you construct one. Unlike many books on preaching, this one is as practical as you get–if you really want to preach without notes, this one will do it for you in a week.

5. A Dash of Style: The Art and Mastery of Punctuation, by Noah Lukeman.

If you like to write, blog, or even tweet, I suggest you read this book. “Why on earth would I read about something as dry and lifeless as punctuation,” you say? Because stylistic punctuation, as this book argues, is what breathes life into your sentences. You’ve never been more romanced by a semi-colon or thrilled to wield a dash than after reading this book. The best part is, Lukeman writes the book with flair and style, often using punctuation in the very way he instructs throughout the book. For example, there are nicknames for every punctuation mark; the period is the Stop Sign; the semicolon is The Bridge; the dash is The Interrupter. And of course, there is a cornucopia of classic writers to give you examples of all of these.


Honorable Mentions.

These are on this list, because they are game-changers, and it would be a crime to keep them off even though the ones above were my first choices. 

  • The Cross of Christ, by John R.W. Stott
  • Paul and Union with Christ: An Exegetical and Theological Study, Constantine R. Campbell.

Obviously, I haven’t read every book that has ever been written, so take my list with an appropriate grain of that salt. Here’s the list I was working from.

What were your favorite reads of 2013? I’d love to hear.

About Lazo

Lazo is the pastor for preaching and vision at Reality SB. He is committed to spreading the value of our union with Christ in Santa Barbara, through the expository preaching of God's Word. You might like these blog posts, 5 Wrong Ways To Comfort Hurting People, or Daisy Love and the Magic Eraser. You can follow Chris on twitter at @LazoChris.

Posted on December 21, 2013, in book review, reading and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off.

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,090 other followers

%d bloggers like this: