Category Archives: sermons

These are weekly sermons form the archives of the Adorn, the gathering of missional millenials that I pastor.

The Good Life: A series through the Sermon on the Mount

The “Good Life” is the life that everyone is after. It’s a vision of well-being that we’ve been taught to create or chase. Yet it’s usually on the other side of the fence where grass always appears greener. It’s the dream that captivates our imagination, and just as often breaks our hearts. Many of us might agree that the Good Life is as evasive as it is alluring.

But the Bible presents us with a far more satisfying picture. Jesus explained that a taste of the Good Life is here with us right now. In his famous Sermon on the Mount, he gave supernatural examples, situations, and case studies of the breaking forth of God’s kingdom in the present age—the Good Life of Heaven coming down into our world. All of this is now on display in Jesus’ most famous and memorable sermon.

Join us as we begin a series through Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, starting September 21st.

Here is a list of the sermons we’ve done so far.

For what to expect, check out the schedule: The Good Life Series.

The Arrival

We’re celebrating Advent at our church. and decided on calling the series “The Arrival.” When Christ arrives, He brings with Him the hope, love, joy, and peace characteristic of the Kingdom.

This is the first sermon of the series; it’s about hope arriving with Christ to his people, freeing them from despair. I pray it bless you on your own Advent!

3 Styles of Preaching

With all the earlier discussion on the blog about orthodoxyBiblical Theology, Scripture, and Bible study, it’s probably fitting that I also address preaching. For a few reasons…

  1. Preaching connects us to all to all those elements listed above (1 Tim. 4:6; 2 Tim. 1:13; Titus 1:9; 2:1)
  2. Preaching is an essential component of a local church (Rom. 10:14; 16:25; Eph. 4:11-13; 1 Tim. 4:13-16; 1 Tim. 5:17; 2 Tim. 4:1-2)
  3. Preaching is imbued with the power of God (Rom 10:13-17; 1 Thess. 2:13)
  4. Preaching allows the glory of God to shine (1 Cor. 1:21; 2:4; 2 Cor. 4:5)

If preaching is so important in the life of the church, we should expect a high standard of the preaching in our own church.

Now, I am not telling you to go pester your pastor on every point of difference you have with their preaching. The congregation I belong to can certainly testify that I have not preached infallibly behind the pulpit, though I aim for nothing less! Mistakes will be made in the pulpit, because no pastor has perfect theology, and we are all learning together. I am also not advocating that you hound every church in the city whose theology you disagree with. That’s a waste of time, and won’t benefit anybody. What is beneficial is identify biblical preaching, because then you can immerse yourself in the life of that church, obeying the Word of God as it is preached rightly. As we progress, I’m certainly not presenting myself as the high standard—but I think we can and should have a baseline when it comes to preaching, and strive for it.

What constitutes “biblical” preaching?

Perhaps we should ask, “What does the Bible think is ‘biblical’ preaching?”

By this, I mean, how does the Bible itself present preaching done correctly? We can find some examples throughout the Bible…

  • “the Levites, explained the law to the people” (Nehemiah 8:7)
  • Jesus “explained to them the things concerning Himself in all the Scriptures” (Luke 24:27)
  • Paul “reasoned with them from the Scriptures, explaining and giving evidence that the Christ had to suffer and rise again from the dead” (Acts 17:2-3)
  • approved workman are “accurately handling the word of truth” (2 Timothy 2:15)
  • “I solemnly charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by His appearing and His kingdom: preach the word” (2 Timothy 4:2)
  • Teach and preach these principles” (1 Timothy 6:2c)
  • “Philip ran up and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and said, ‘Do you understand what you are reading?‘ And he said, ‘Well, how could I, unless someone guides me?’ And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him. Now the passage of Scripture which he was reading was this: ‘He was led as a sheep to slaughter; and as a lamb before its shearer is silent, so He does not open His mouth. In humiliation His judgment was taken away; who will relate His generation? For His life is removed from the earth.” The eunuch answered Philip and said, ‘Please tell me, of whom does the prophet say this? Of himself or of someone else?’ Then Philip opened his mouth, and beginning from this Scripture he preached Jesus to him” (Acts 8:30-35)

I’ll stop there.

From the Old Testament to the New Testament, a pattern emerges: explanation, teaching, and preaching (which is proclamation). In other words, the Bible’s own “opinion” of correct preaching is at least the explanation and teaching of the meaning of the Scriptures, and the proclamation of it’s truths.

A preacher’s primary job is to give a sense of the Scriptures meaning, and then exhort people to respond. 

Biblical preaching is expository preaching. 

Mark Dever helpfully explained expositional preaching as explaining a Scripture’s main point, then explaining and proclaiming that main point in a sermon. Or even more succinctly, “Making the main point of the text the main point of the sermon.”

So according to the New Testament epistles (letters written to early churches), a church must include expository preaching as part of its worship gathering.

But, you say,

There are a lot of types of preaching! Some preachers preach for 15 minutes, others for an hour; some preach on a single verse, and others preach whole chapters or even books; in between these are so many different styles of preaching: storytelling, verse-by-verse, series, etc. How do you know which one is good?

I’ve heard some of my own friends elevate sermon styles over others, and denigrate others for preaching in a way that they do not like. Notice that this has nothing to do with faithful preaching, but preaching preference.

The requirement of faithful preaching is expository not stylistic. In fact, different styles of preaching are useful, as well as expository, that is, they can explain the Bible using different methods of communication. Here are a few (though not all)… Read the rest of this entry

Chris Lazo | Alcohol & The Christian

Ephesians 5:18 (Sermon notes)

Don’t waste your time on bones

I once suggested the necessity of reading a variety of authors and backgrounds to keep from becoming overly biased and ignorant. Then I wrote that this requires chewing on the meat and spitting out the bones since no author is perfect. Now I’m writing that some books, sermons, podcasts, etc., are simply not worth wasting your time on at all. Here’s what I mean, to further my last analogy…

I was once at a bar-b-que where the main course was chicken. I grabbed a couple of wings and threw them on my plate next to a generous helping of mashed potatoes (my mouth is watering as I write this), sat down, already famished, and began devouring a wing. To my dismay, there wasn’t anything there to begin with—the only bit of existing meat lie deep between stacks of chicken bones—I felt like I was trying to chew slivers of string cheese stapled to toothpicks. I took two small bites before throwing the remains back on my plate, and grabbed the other wing hoping for a better catch. No luck. Those emaciated chicken wings were so boney that it wasn’t even worth eating them at all. I should have stuck with my hunch and filled my whole plate with mashed potatoes! The moral of the story is:

Chicken wings don’t have enough meat on them to be worth your time—especially when there are thighs on the other serving table.

Authors, preachers, and speakers are basically the same. There are times when you feel like you are chewing on a chicken wing—sure, there’s a pocket of teriyaki sauce that globs up and whets your appetite when you bite it, but there’s not enough meat to make navigating those bones worthwhile—kind of like the preacher or author who constantly drops clever one-liners but without any substance. The earth is full of these! Do yourself a favor: find something else that will satisfy your hunger and don’t waste time on finger-food anymore.

It’s probably clear that no one out there will ever offer a perfect meal of words except for Jesus. But that’s why we read widely, chew on the meat, and spit out the bones—otherwise we wouldn’t learn anything. Just stick to those preachers and writers that actually have substance, or you’ll wake up with a mouth full of bone marrow, disgruntled because you can’t seem to figure out why there’s no spiritual growth in your life.

Perhaps because you’re not really eating?

Reality Sermon: Chris Lazo | The Kingdom Calendar

Ephesians 5:15-16

Reality Sermon: Chris Lazo | Finding Blind Spots

Ephesians 5:11-14

Reality Sermon: Chris Lazo | Switching Sides

Ephesians 5:7-10

Cast: Reality

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via Vimeo / Reality’s videos http://vimeo.com/65085735

Reality Sermon: Chris Lazo | Vice & Virtue

Ephesians 5:3-5

Reality Sermon: Chris Lazo | What Does Love Got To Do With It?

Ephesians 5:2

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