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Meditating on God’s Word, a guest post by Jason Lomelino

I’ve been looking forward to to this weeks post in A Contemplative Approach To Christianity.

This series is dedicated to introducing the quieter side of Christian practice, featuring a new writer every week. These are all from men or women who have been able to connect with God in the middle of the noise–often using spiritual disciplines that are very similar to those found throughout the history of ancient Christian church. I’ve also asked these authors to share details about what their practices look like, should any of you wish to partake. I hope this series has been as refreshing for you as it has for me! 

So far, we’ve looked at Contemplative Prayer, and Cultivating a Lifestyle of Listening. Now, let’s move on to a personal favorite of mine–and one which I believe all others to hinge on–the meditation on God’s word.


I don’t think I know a better person to share about meditating on God’s word than my friend, Jason Lomelino.

Jason is a pastor at Isla Vista Church, where he, his wife, Holly, and their five kids live and do ministry together. They are a compelling presence of God’s love in a city that never slows down. I’ve heard many testimonies of transformation in people from Isla Vista and UCSB by God through the Lomelino family. (You can read some of their stories in Jason’s book, Jesus Burgers). I experienced this “presence” during a public worship night on the UCSB campus in the aftermath of the much publicized shootings that took place there. Jason addressed the crowd of hundreds with fatherly love, brotherly tears, and the mercies of God that night. I wondered how he was able to pour out so much love during a time when his heart was so broken. But now I understand. After reading his essay, you’ll understand too.

The rest of this post is in Jason’s words…

***

I am originally from San Diego and every year in Carlsbad these extraordinary colorful flowers bloom on a fifty-acre hillside that overlooks the Pacific Ocean.  It is breathtaking, even from your car as you drive by the hillside.  However, the majority of locals are content with just viewing them from their car as they drive by.  They don’t want to spend the time to slow down and get out of their car to view this work of art up close.  But in order to really enjoy the flowers, one must slow down and go walk amongst them.  Meditating on the Word is a similar experience. 

There is something special about slowing down, turning off distractions, and opening your heart and life to God through His Word.  There are many ways to grow deeper in our relationship with God; some may call them spiritual disciplines.  Yet I have not found any of them to be richer or more rewarding than meditating on the Word of God.  Many Christians know we are called to meditate on the Word, though in my experience few actually know how to do it, and even fewer actually do it.

Meditating on the Word is not about how much you read but the way you read it.   Read the rest of this entry

Richard Rohr on prayer and contemplation

In some circles that I’ve been in, even contemplation and meditation have been ways to seek identity of importance, just like being charismatic was back in the seventies…the disguises of the ego are endless. So we must make sure that, in taking on a spiritual practice, we are not just seeking moral high ground in our own eyes and the eyes of anybody else. Is meditation leading me to a new vulnerability and intimacy, or the opposite? is contemplation leading me to what John Main calls dispossession, instead of another new possession? Be careful of any I have our I am language, except the great I am that we are in God. Maybe this is one interpretation of Jesus’ advice to “pray in secret.”

Read through the New Testament in 2013

We have gone through the Bible over the years as a church, with different reading plans that all had as their main purpose a desire to expose the Christian to the whole counsel of God in one year. Each of these has been so enriching!

What we want to do this year is to focus, not on the entire Biblical canon, but on the entire New Testament, as well as the Psalms and Proverbs. We’ve chosen a reading plan, called Project 345+, which accomplishes this in an exceptional way:

  • the weekdays are devoted to reading through the New Testament,
  • the weekends are for Psalms and Proverbs.

You’ll notice that the way this plan navigates through the New Testament is by moving through one of the Gospels (John), before branching off into the Acts of the Apostles and Romans. After a round of that…it does another Gospel (Luke), followed by a few more epistles, and the pattern continues, so that a steady diet of the New Testament is processed throughout the year. In this way, you’re getting the full realm of the New Testament throughout the year.

What I am looking forward to most in 2013, is the chance, not simply for exposure, but for marination and maturation. Going through the New Testament will allow us to take our time, and even go back and study portions of Scripture that we read.

As a church, we want to slow down during 2013, and enjoy Jesus through His Word!

Below, you’ll find a link that will provide for you all the resources necessary for starting this years reading! If you are on twitter, the official hashtag is #1YearBible. Feel free to post, give spiritual insights, ask questions, or just browse other people’s tweets.

Enjoy Jesus! http://www.realitysb.com/one-year-bible/

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