Blog Archives

Make Good Tables ~ renewing our sense of vocation

Whenever someone shares the call of God on their life with me, it seems almost invariably to do with a ministerial vocation…

“Lazo, God is calling me to be a pastor.”

“I think I’m being called into the ministry.”

“I have a heart for missions.”

“I want to be a church planter.”

As one who is in a full-time “ministry” vocation, I can’t help but get excited when others are sensing a similar calling. But I also can’t help but be a bit perplexed. No one ever comes up to me and says, “Lazo, I think God is calling me to be a school teacher!” or, “Chris, I think I’m being called to work at Habit Burger for a season!” or, “God is calling me to be a carpenter! Can you pray for me?” The only callings I ever hear about, as if these are the only ones that are worth a Christian’s excitement, have to do with some type of clerical ministry.

Maybe we think that the only  way to be faithful to God in our work, is if we are working for God in His church. It was normative in the middle ages to bifurcate the work of priests from that of the “laity.” In other words, if you wanted to do “holy” work, you had to get a job with the church. Everything else was menial. Of course, this divide was one of the false teachings that Luther, Calvin, Kuyper, and many reformers after them were quick to deny. For one, the doctrine of common grace reveals that there is no such divide between sacred and secular, for the entire sphere of life is under the domain of God’s benevolence. Abraham Kuyper, the Dutch reformer, was famous for championing this worldview. He opined that if common grace is true “the curse should no longer rest upon the world itself, but upon that which is sinful in it, and instead of monastic flight from the world the duty is now emphasized of serving God in the world, in every position in life” (Kuyper, Lectures. 30). Secondly, God no longer sanctifies jobs, as he did in the Old Testament cultus, with its priestly duties and unique ministerial work. In the New Covenant, God sanctifies people (Heb. 2:11; 10:10; 13:12). This means that a vocation is sanctified by the Christian working in it, without separation between secular work and ministry. A carpenter is on the same mission as a pastor.

Unfortunately, many Christians carry on the same dreary divide between sacred and secular to this day. This is not to say that we don’t need callings in vocational ministry today. We do! But roughly 1% of a church assembly will ever go into “church” ministry. The overwhelming majority of a church membership will be in the world of science, arts, education, politics, technology, law, retail, etc. If our mindset is still stuck in the middle ages, many church-goers will not think of their vocations as holy callings, but menial jobs to trudge through before they find something more meaningful. But the church of Christ needs a renewal in its sense of vocation lest the power offered by Christianity is one day found only in the four walls of a secluded cloister. We need school teachers who feel called by God to teach math. We need CEO’s who believe God has set them apart to lead well. We need construction workers who build for more than the paycheck. We need scientists who want to discover the world of God. We need grocery baggers who love to make grocers feel welcome and the environment hospitable. We need baristas who know how to deflect the grumpy demeanor of a sleepy customer with a smile and a mean cup of coffee.

But nonetheless, this divide continues still. Even our perception of what faithfulness means in a secular vocation is still highly spiritualized. For example, if we do suppose that our secular vocation is a calling of God, then we limit our understanding of job faithfulness to, say, evangelism, or perhaps the hope that a Bible study will spontaneously appear in the break room. But what about the content of our job descriptions? Do we think everything but doing our jobs well is what God is calling us to do? The Apostle Paul’s calling on every Christian is that “each one must live his life in the situation the Lord assigned when God called him. This is what I command in all the churches” (1 Cor. 7:17, HCSB).

Timothy Keller quotes Dorothy Sayers in his book Every Good Endeavor,

The church’s approach to an intelligent carpenter is usually confined to exhorting him not to be drunk and disorderly in his leisure hours and to come to church on Sundays. What the church should be telling him is this: that the very first demand that his religion makes upon him is that he should make good tables. (Creed or Chaos, 56-7, emphasis mine)

Keller describes this as the “ministry of competence,” where Scripture directs skilled men and woman of God to greatness in what they do, faithfulness with their callings, and integrity in the workplace (76). The majority of Christians are not called to leave the secular behind to pursue ministerial vocations. We are called to be faithful where God has us now.

Think of the impact that simple stewardship of work would have on the world around us. If it is true that only 1% of a local church will ever pursue vocational ministry, than what of the 99%? Now I know that being a faithful employee will not save the lost. Nor will cultural transformation, or relational evangelism. Only the proclamation of the gospel can act as the means by which the Holy Spirit brings the dead to life (Rom 10:14-15). But if  we Christians worked well in the field of our employment, perhaps our co-workers would take us more seriously when we share the story of redemption. Or even better, maybe they will start to ask us.

When passion becomes apathy: A plea to my fellow millennials

Millennials: The Generation of Promise. Pt.3

Myth #1 – College will automatically get you a dream job

A while back, I pointed out how the relentless pampering of an older generation has cultured Millennials. Soon after, we mulled over the lack of opportunities to spend our inherited greatness. Now we have a group of young people who feel that they’ve wasted their potential. An environment of coddling with no opportunities is a cruel trick.

But not as cruel as the trick you play on yourself by going to college.

Higher ed is what they tell every Millennial to do after graduating high school, yet no one explains how this is going to help. As far as we know, it’s a magical band-aid.

Sooner of later, you find yourself disappointed for toiling those four years, expecting a significant job, with benefits, and a $40K annual return, yet only experiencing cold-calls and shoulder shrugs. It turns out, that college degree is not as magical as you thought.

The one thing I would tell college students before they packed their bags for schoolRead the rest of this entry

Millennials: The Promised Generation, part 2 – Redeeming Lost Talent

At the end of January, I asked what you would do if you were given so much promise and deprived of so much opportunity. All Millennials are. You are the promising generation, and you know it; decades of pampering and care has gone into a Millennial generation’s upbringing, and now  you have come of age.

Unfortunately, there’s no where left for you to be awesome.

The first post was a wake up call. I know you all like it more when I write inspiring posts about Millennials—after all, I am one, and at a DOB of 1981, I barely made it!—but I can’t help noticing a bad trend emerging from those of us who are called to speak into the lives of Millennials.

Millennials are so high up on a pedestal, that we forgot what it was like to fall on the ground.

The world isn’t always fair. There are not always opportunities open for us to waltz into, and this has caused many to feel ripped off. It’s true for college leaders, as well. We love that you are the promised generation! We have also placed so much hope in you, that we are sometimes quick to disregard the entire picture, that circumstances do not always turn out ideal, and in ignoring reality, we sometimes explain away a basic understanding that life is unromantic. You are given great gifts, talents, and education, only to find that life has given you the shaft.

But God has plenty of opportunity for you in his mission.

While you may not get a high-paying job with benefits right out of college, your calling in life will always concern being on God’s mission to make disciples of the nations and your city. I want to propose a biblical worldview of calling.

You have not been seasoned for this moment to make much of yourself and career, but to put God’s eternal purposes on display. God is out to renew creation, from the material nature of the environment, to structures, cultures, and societies. And of course, he is in the process of renewing and restoring a broken group of humanity for his own glory. Approach life differently.

Use your gifts to make much of others and align your calling with the mission of Jesus.

That’s redemption. It means your life is not wasted. It means God is not ignoring you. It means there is a plan. And it means you are in the middle of it, albeit, one larger than yourself. This is what Peter was referring to when saying that “As each one has received a special gift, use it in serving one another as good stewards of the manifold grace of God” ( 1 Peter 4:10-11). Even if you’re stuck in a dead-end job; the glorious mission of God is always available to you in the form of servanthood, for in the serving of others, you loosen the fragrance of Jesus.

It’s less glamorous, but then again, when has “glamorous” ever changed the world?

We were made for more.

Millennials: The Promising Generation

Millennials want to make a difference because they are pampered and sheltered.

When generational experts, Neil Howe and William Strauss, wrote their defining book on Millennials, they highlighted our generation’s pros and cons, namely, that we had a desire to achieve greatness, and our parent’s generation was the driving force behind this.

We are the result of a domino effect.

Some mothers will recall the tragic crime in September 1982, when “a cyanide-tainted Tylenol triggered an October wave of parental panic over trick-or-treating” (Howe and Strauss, 43). On its heels was a “national hysteria over the sexual abuse of toddlers,” an immediate distaste for classic 80’s horror flicks victimizing children, replaced with a flood of sitcoms portraying kids as the heroes. While parents filtered the family television, American school teachers experienced a newfound pressure to raise better kids in the classroom. And the trend continued.

Our generation is almost entirely conditioned for greatness

By the time we reached grade school, we had already adopted a skip in our step (or perhaps a leap in our step). And why not? We were being preened to take over the world by an earlier generation that wanted to leave a better legacy. We evolved from the latchkey kids of our ancestors to kids inheriting all the keys on the latch.

Millennials are unlike any generation that has gone before. And because of this, there is an overwhelming pressure to succeed. Unfortunately, the opportunities available to an aspiring millennial are underwhelming enough to damper the passion of the most resolute college grad. Our parents didn’t just leave us with a different outlook on life, they left us with a different life. Look no farther than a broken economy, steep living prices, and a job famine. It’s as if someone taught us how to fish in the middle of the Sahara. The world’s greatest generation, pampered with hopeful expectations, and sheltered from the grim truth of everything our parents never wanted us to experience. How do we handle this? Can we take advantage of the momentum we’ve been given?

What do you do when someone promises so much and gives back so little?

How to approach your future (part 3)

I wanted to save the best for last…

Put your identity in Jesus

You will undergo failure.

Everything will be ok if your identity is secured in Christ. Consequently, if your security is in anything else (like your job),  you will crumble under the weight of failure and disappointment.

But you don’t have to spin your wheels trying to justify your reason to exist, when you are, as Paul declared, “being justified as a gift by His grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus” (Romans 3:24)

Boom.

(image © Washington Post)

How to approach your future (part 2)

Be ready to go

Some college students are perfectionists. And since they cannot make up their minds, they forego every opportunity (even some great ones) because they are not sure if it’s exactly “What God has called them to.” I’ve seen people crushed by anxiety over decisions like this.

Perfectionists, sometimes God will call you to mediocre opportunities before he brings you to your dream job. If you keep looking for the perfect job situation to drop from the sky, you risk missing out on a lot opportunities for God to glorify himself, not to mention relief from your need for perfection :-)

You still need to hear the voice of the Lord, because not every job is the right job. But seek the Lord in every opportunity (or lack thereof), even if it’s not what you were hoping for. It might change your life.

How To Approach Your Future (part 1.of.3)

Be ready to let go

(Not everyone has a problem with this. Some of you are itching to let go of what your doing in pursuit of something better. I wrote something for you here).

This post is for the Millennials who are content with life as it is.

Whether you are working a regular job, or hibernating in your mom’s house playing World of Warcraft, you are satisfied with the way things are, and are not particularly open to other opportunities. This isn’t a bad thing in itself.

But God may want to cause a disturbance in your system.

Below is a photo that I took from the top of the Mason Street campus at Brooks Institute of Photography, where I used to work. You can’t see it, but across the street and to the right of this window is the original Channel Islands Surf shop where Britt Merrick used to work. At different points in life, we both had dreams. I worked at Mason Street Studios aspiring to be a professional photographer, and Britt grew up across the street, awaiting the day he would take over Channel Islands.

Ironically, we now work with each other in the white warehouse pictured in center of this frame, doing what we thoroughly enjoy, yet never envisioned. God moved us from one side of the block to the other.

My new career path is not always something to romanticize over…I would probably have an easier life doing what I planned on. But ease in life is not a good motivation. Nor is it necessarily fulfilling. You don’t want to go through life settling for what’s “good” when “outstanding” is available.

We had to let go of something good, to get a hold of something better.

More importantly, we had to obey God. And from my own experience, there is no sorrow in that at all. There is never a regretful aftertaste in obeying Jesus.

The joy is always worthwhile.

There will be times when you know God is speaking to you about his plans for your life.

You just gotta let go.

Have you ever been in a place where you had to choose between two things? How did you handle it?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,505 other followers

%d bloggers like this: